Review ♥ Ramsay by Mia Sheridan

June 19, 2016 Angela Contemporary, Reviews, Romance

Review ♥ Ramsay by Mia SheridanRamsay by Mia Sheridan
Published by Self-Published on June 19th 2016
Genres: Contemporary, Romance
Pages: 318
Format: ARC
three-stars

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Lydia De Havilland is shocked when Brogan Ramsay suddenly reappears in her life. Several years before, Brogan was the son of her family's gardener, and the boy she hurt and betrayed. But Brogan is no longer the quiet, sensitive boy she remembers. Now he's a man—gorgeous, powerful . . . and seeking vengeance.

Brogan Ramsay can't let go of the memory of Lydia tricking him cruelly, leaving his heart shattered and his family penniless. And now he's back to destroy her family the way his was destroyed. There's only one problem . . . the girl who wounded him so badly years ago is now a woman who still has the power to render him breathless.

Ramsay is the story of betrayal and wrath, of the strength of regret and the power of forgiveness. It is the story of the thin veil between love and hate, and how more often than not, when we seek to inflict pain on others, the heart we wound is our own.

THIS IS A STAND-ALONE SIGN OF LOVE NOVEL, INSPIRED BY ARIES. New Adult Contemporary Romance: Due to strong language and sexual content, this book is not intended for readers under the age of 18.

I’m a big admirer of Mia Sheridan’s work. Her stories tend to be unique, absorbing, and thought provoking. The beginning of Ramsay is strong, and I was quickly sucked into the story by all the backstabbing and scheming. I loved the pull between Lydia De Havilland and Brogan Ramsay, and the prospect of a relationship do-over appealed to me. I also enjoyed their role reversal and Lydia eating humble pie. Unfortunately, my interest began to wane as the focus moves from revenge to making restitution to the pair grappling with trust issues.

Ramsay is about the consequences of resentment and the power of forgiveness. However, the message is tainted by Lydia’s willingness to repeatedly forgive, excuse, and enable her loathsome brother. Stuart seriously doesn’t have one redeemable quality. Lydia is a smart woman who throws common sense out the window whenever her brother is around, and eventually I found it difficult to stay invested.

I really appreciated the quiet moments when Brogan and Lydia spend time together just getting reacquainted. Between their trust issues, Stuart’s interference and Brogan’s past, though, conflicts arise that seem rather convoluted and avoidable. Why is it so difficult for characters to talk to each other?

Brogan is such a gentle, sweet soul. He’s a bit clueless and insecure at times, but his generosity, passion, and even his stubbornness make him irresistible.

My favorite characters are Brogan’s loyal sister, Eileen, and his best friend, Fionn. Fionn is an Irish charmer and if you want a crash course on Irish slang and curse words, he’s your man. He’s absolutely worthy of having his own story.

This is a “didn’t love it, didn’t hate it” scenario for me. Ramsay definitely has an intriguing plot, and I’m sure many Mia Sheridan fans will enjoy this story.

 

Recommended for fans of:
Irish culture
Revenge plots
Rags to riches

 

** ARC received in exchange for an honest review. **

three-stars



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